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FAQs

How can stainless steel rust?

Stainless steel is a name given to many different grades of material with varying degrees of resistance to rust. Key West Boats uses only the high grade of 316 or better S.S., but even this grade can rust under some conditions. Stainless is an active metal that will form its own protective layer called a pacification layer. This protective layer can be compromised by some solvents and abrasives leaving the metal subject to corrosion until the layer can be reformed. The pacification process itself requires oxygen which comes from contact with the air. Therefore if the metal is allowed to stay in constant contact with salt water the protective layer can be broken down and rust can begin. Abrasives and harsh chemicals should be avoided when cleaning your boat to protect the stainless parts along with a freshwater rinsing after use in salt water, but this brings up another possiblity. Some freshwater contains chemicals or minerals which can promote corrosion. In some parts of the country well water contains harmless minerals for human consumption but those same minerals can promote corrosion in the stainless parts on your boat. It may be necessary to install a filter in your water supply to protect your boat's hardware in these cases.

For a more complete explanation of Stainless Steel and its properties there are several websites on line to use for reference.



Why does my live well overflow?

All live wells in a Key West Boat are fed by an electric pump and drained by gravity. The pumps are often over sized to allow for rapid filling and this can and often does result in a higher fill rate than gravity can keep up with for drainage. The over flow most often happens when the boat is sitting at rest and the level of water in the live well is closer to the level of water outside of the boat. The difference in the water levels is part of what determines the rate of flow with regards to drainage. While on plane the difference in level is greater than when at rest so the overflow is most likely to occur at rest. It is not caused by the overflow outlet being under water at rest. The solution is to simply use the inlet valve inside the live well to control the flow into the live well to match the rate of flow out. Smaller pumps could be used of course to eliminate this needed adjustment but that would result in slower live well filling and the bigger pumps seem to last longer.



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Glossary of Terms

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Aerate
To force air and oxygen into livewells to keep fish of bait alive. Also, to force air under the running surface of a hull.
aerator pump
A term usually used improperly. Literally it refers to a pump used  to insert air into water thereby oxegenating the water for the purpose of keeping bait or fish alive. It is commonly used to refer to the pump used to inject water into a live well, which should be referred to as a live well pump.